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Author Topic: How to replace broken router  (Read 3192 times)

chapellane69

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How to replace broken router
« on: June 04, 2010, 10:13:09 PM »

My original modem-router (ZyXEL P660HW-61), which previously had seemed very good, is acting up.  The modem is fine and wireless communication is fine, but the wired side of the router is up the spout.  All devices connected to it intermittently lose their connections for a second or so at a time, while devices connected wirelessly have no issues.  The disconnections seem to be becoming more frequent.

My "proper" computer has no wireless capability and neither does my printer, while I can easily add it to the computer, adding it to the printer seems more tricky, so I do need to have somewhere I can attach wires.

My thought at the moment is to keep the modem, and given that my ADSL connection is never going to get up to anything close to 54Mb/s use the ZyXEL to relay the internet to the rest of the house via its wireless device.  I'd then get another router with a wireless connection to stick the wires into.  I'd thought that a router with a radio that could do 2.4GHz and 5GHz at the same time could fill the house with 5GHz goodness (for the devices that can do that) and use it's 2.4GHz radio to talk to the ZyXEL and the modem.

Since we got the ZyXEL it has had to be plugged into the telephone line on the end of an extension wired into the main socket (because it has to be somewhere near the printer and the computer).  If I changed to this weird scheme, I could move the ZyXEL to the main socket and even disconnect the extension completely and maybe we get a bit more internet speed that way.  The other point to note is that with the ZyXEL where it is now, wireless coverage in the rest of the house is quite poor (the computer room is an extension with old outside walls separating it from everywhere else), and maybe having two things broadcasting from different places would give things a fighting chance of connecting wherever they are in the house.

Anyway the question is, "Is all this messing around likely to be any benefit whatever, or should I just throw away the old ZyXEL entirely and put a new modem-router in its place?"

Neil
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HPsauce

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Re: How to replace broken router
« Reply #1 on: June 04, 2010, 10:14:15 PM »

Bin it, start again.
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roseway

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Re: How to replace broken router
« Reply #2 on: June 04, 2010, 10:35:06 PM »

Brief but to the point. :)  I agree with HP.
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  Eric

chapellane69

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Re: How to replace broken router
« Reply #3 on: June 10, 2010, 01:27:46 PM »

Bin it, start again.

OK - I can do that.  Thanks (both of you).

Now it's becoming more urgent.  The wired side of the router is now, rather than fleetingly losing connections, only fleetingly granting them.  I've been looking at different kinds to replace the ZyXEL, but it seems as if every time I see one I like, and look for reviews, there are plenty of people who think it is the bee's knees but a surprising number who had very serious problems (often with multiple examples of the same device) to the extent that the device becomes useless!

It makes choosing quite difficult.  Do I just buy one I fancy, and keep my fingers crossed that I'm not one of the unlucky ones?

Neil
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roseway

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Re: How to replace broken router
« Reply #4 on: June 10, 2010, 01:41:48 PM »

I've tried numerous routers over the years, and I can't say that any of them was useless. The very bad reviews which you mention probably apply only to particular circumstances. We had a recent discussion on the subject here but to summarise, I think the safest bet is to choose one of the popular models with a Broadcom chipset.
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  Eric

HPsauce

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Re: How to replace broken router
« Reply #5 on: June 10, 2010, 04:28:04 PM »

Just a thought - who's your ISP and are they offering a "free" wireless router to new customers?
If so, existing customers can usually get the too by extending their contract.
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