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Author Topic: The Phenomenon (2020)  (Read 4028 times)

neil

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The Phenomenon (2020)
« on: February 24, 2023, 02:36:38 PM »

The Phenomenon (2020) | Trailer HD

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=onEXmLX2ZZQ

The Phenomenon (2020) | FULL

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a0Kr1TwKhQk
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burakkucat

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Re: The Phenomenon (2020)
« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2023, 05:01:23 PM »

Have you watched it?
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neil

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Re: The Phenomenon (2020)
« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2023, 04:27:19 PM »

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Alex Atkin UK

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Re: The Phenomenon (2020)
« Reply #3 on: February 25, 2023, 09:24:00 PM »

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PD00QnQ3HO4

A bit painfully long-winded as usual, but rather relevant.
« Last Edit: February 25, 2023, 09:26:36 PM by Alex Atkin UK »
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neil

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Re: The Phenomenon (2020)
« Reply #4 on: February 27, 2023, 05:45:21 PM »

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PD00QnQ3HO4

A bit painfully long-winded as usual, but rather relevant.

the person who is behind the release of these videos. According to him these three videos, go fast, gimble and tic tac are the least compelling ones.
Then he talks about the five observables. Here are the five from the article and these are the most interesting part of this latest (UFO) now known as UAP thing going on in USA.

Quote
1) Anti-gravity lift
Unlike any known aircraft, these objects have been sighted overcoming the earth’s gravity with no visible means of propulsion. They also lack any flight surfaces, such as wings. In the Nimitz incident, witnesses describe the crafts as tubular, shaped like a Tic Tac candy.

2) Sudden and instantaneous acceleration
The objects may accelerate or change direction so quickly that no human pilot could survive the g-forces—they would be crushed. In the Nimitz incident, radar operators say they tracked one of the UFOs as it dropped from the sky at more than 30 times the speed of sound. Black Aces squadron commander David Fravor, the Nimitz-based fighter pilot who was sent to intercept one of the objects, likened its rapid side-to-side movements, later captured on infrared video, to that of a ping-pong ball. Radar operators on the USS Princeton, part of the Nimitz carrier group, tracked the object accelerating from a standing position to traveling 60 miles in a minute—an astounding 3,600 miles an hour. According to manufacturer Boeing, the F/A 18 Super Hornet fighter jet typically currently reaches a maximum speed of Mach 1.6, or about 1,200 miles an hour.

READ MORE: UFO Stories

3) Hypersonic velocities without signatures
If an aircraft travels faster than the speed of sound, it typically leaves "signatures," like vapor trails and sonic booms. Many UFO accounts note the lack of such evidence.

4) Low observability, or cloaking
Even when objects are observed, getting a clear and detailed view of them—either through pilot sightings, radar or other means—remains difficult. Witnesses generally only see the glow or haze around them.

5) Trans-medium travel
Some UAP have been seen moving easily in and between different environments, such as space, the earth’s atmosphere and even water. In the Nimitz incident, witnesses described a UFO hovering over a churning "disturbance" just under the ocean's otherwise calm surface, leading to speculation that another craft had entered the water. USS Princeton radar operator Gary Vorhees later confirmed from a Navy sonar operator in the area that day that a craft was moving faster than 70 knots, roughly two times the speed of nuclear subs.

No one has yet gotten close to crafts that display these traits, so their origins are still unknown. Are they a super-top-secret U.S. defense project? Do they hail from Russia? China? Or from even further afield? The only thing we do know is that their capabilities exceed any technologies currently in the U.S. arsenal.

https://www.history.com/news/ufo-sightings-speed-appearance-movement

[Moderator edited to replace the above [code][/code] tags with [quote][/quote] tags to avoid the need for horizontal scrolling.]
« Last Edit: February 27, 2023, 06:04:48 PM by burakkucat »
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Alex Atkin UK

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Re: The Phenomenon (2020)
« Reply #5 on: February 27, 2023, 07:10:16 PM »

It would be so easy to fake and shoot things entirely out of context.  The most mundane things look freaky in night vision or B&W.

Using things like RADAR to determine that something suddenly changed direction too fast, or is moving too fast, is like pinging a host on the Internet and saying the server MUST be down because you lost a couple of packets.  The technology being used to capture this stuff is not even close to good enough to be considered evidence.

Plus read the comments on the thunderf00t video, its largely considered that the military encourage this misunderstanding as it allows them to get funding they otherwise might not.
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neil

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Re: The Phenomenon (2020)
« Reply #6 on: February 28, 2023, 03:49:13 PM »

It would be so easy to fake and shoot things entirely out of context.  The most mundane things look freaky in night vision or B&W.

Using things like RADAR to determine that something suddenly changed direction too fast, or is moving too fast, is like pinging a host on the Internet and saying the server MUST be down because you lost a couple of packets.  The technology being used to capture this stuff is not even close to good enough to be considered evidence.

Plus read the comments on the thunderf00t video, its largely considered that the military encourage this misunderstanding as it allows them to get funding they otherwise might not.

It's not just the USA but other countries and their air forces have faced such objects. Let me share some videos.
White House "This is not just an issue for the United States, but for the rest of the world"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=65FKG3nou_o
Belgian Air Force
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q2LmB6m_BNo
Brazilian Air Force
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d1tYLbkYgnY
Japanese Air Force
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DOI2NL-tLn0
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neil

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Re: The Phenomenon (2020)
« Reply #7 on: March 01, 2023, 06:50:10 PM »

We Have a Real UFO Problem. And It’s Not Balloons.

Quote from: Ryan Graves
On a clear, sunny day in April 2014, two F/A-18s took off for an air combat training mission off the coast of Virginia. The jets, part of my Navy fighter squadron, climbed to an altitude of 12,000 and steered towards Warning Area W-72, an exclusive block of airspace ten miles east of Virginia Beach. All traffic into the training area goes through a single GPS point at a set altitude — almost like a doorway into a massive room where military jets can operate without running into other aircraft. Just at the moment the two jets crossed the threshold, one of the pilots saw a dark gray cube inside of a clear sphere — motionless against the wind, fixed directly at the entry point. The jets, only 100 feet apart, zipped past the object on either side. The pilots had come so dangerously close to something they couldn’t identify that they terminated the training mission immediately and returned to base.

“I almost hit one of those damn things!” the flight leader, still shaken by the incident, told us shortly after in the pilots’ ready room. We all knew exactly what he meant. “Those damn things” had been plaguing us for the previous eight months.

I joined the U.S. Navy in 2009 and underwent years of rigorous training as a pilot. Specifically, we are trained to be expert observers in identifying aircraft with our sensors and our own eyes. It’s our job to know what’s in our operating area. That’s why, in 2014, after upgrades were made to our radar system, our squadron made a startling discovery: There were unknown objects in our airspace.


Initially, the objects were showing up on our newly upgraded radars and we assumed they were “ghosts in the machine,” or software glitches. But then we began to correlate the radar tracks with multiple surveillance systems, including infrared sensors that detected heat signatures. Then came the hair-raising near misses that required us to take evasive action.

These were no mere balloons. The unidentified aerial phenomena (UAP) accelerated at speeds up to Mach 1, the speed of sound. They could hold their position, appearing motionless, despite Category 4 hurricane-force winds of 120 knots. They did not have any visible means of lift, control surfaces or propulsion — in other words nothing that resembled normal aircraft with wings, flaps or engines. And they outlasted our fighter jets, operating continuously throughout the day. I am a formally trained engineer, but the technology they demonstrated defied my understanding.

After that near-miss, we had no choice but to submit a safety report, hoping that something could be done before it was too late. But there was no official acknowledgement of what we experienced and no further mechanism to report the sightings — even as other aircrew flying along the East coast quietly began sharing similar experiences. Our only option was to cancel or move our training, as the UAP continued to maneuver in our vicinity unchecked.

Nearly a decade later we still don’t know what they were.

When I retired from the Navy in 2019, I was the first active-duty pilot to come forward publicly and testify to Congress. In the years since, there has been some notable coverage of the encounters and Congress has taken some action to force the military and intelligence agencies to do much more to get to the bottom of these mysteries.

But there has not been anything near the level of public and official attention that has been paid to the recent shoot downs of a Chinese spy balloon and the three other unknown objects that were likely research balloons.

And that’s a problem.

Advanced objects demonstrating cutting-edge technology that we cannot explain are routinely flying over our military bases or entering restricted airspace.

“UAP events continue to occur in restricted or sensitive airspace, highlighting possible concerns for safety of flight or adversary collection activity,” the Director of National Intelligence reported last month, citing 247 new reports over the last 17 months. “Some UAP appeared to remain stationary in winds aloft, move against the wind, maneuver abruptly, or move at considerable speed, without discernible means of propulsion.”

The Navy has also officially acknowledged 11 near misses with UAP that required evasive action and triggered mandatory safety reports between 2004 and 2021. Advanced UAP also pose a growing safety hazard to commercial airliners. Last May, the Federal Aviation Administration issued an alert after a passenger aircraft flying over West Virginia experienced a rare failure of two major systems while passing underneath what appeared to be a UAP.

One thing we do know is these craft aren’t part of some classified U.S. project. “We were quite confident that was not the explanation,” Scott Bray, the deputy director of the Office of Naval Intelligence, testified before Congress last year.

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio confirmed in a recent interview that whatever the origin of these objects it is not the U.S. military. “We have things flying over our military bases and places where we’re conducting military exercises and we don’t know what it is and it isn’t ours,” said Rubio, who is vice chair of the Intelligence Committee.

President Joe Biden rightly points out the real national security and aviation safety risks, from “foreign intelligence collection” to “hazard to civilian air traffic,” that arise from low-tech “balloon-like” entities. I applaud his new order to create an interagency UAP taskforce and a government-wide effort to address unidentified objects, and his proposal to make sure all aerial craft are registered and identifiable according to a global standard is good common-sense.


However, what the president did not address during his press conference Feb. 16 were the UAP that exhibit advanced performance capabilities. Where is the transparency and urgency from the administration and Congress to investigate highly advanced objects in restricted airspace that our military cannot explain? How will this new taskforce be more effective than existing efforts if we are not being clear and direct about the scope and nature of advanced UAP?

The American public must demand accountability. We need to understand what is in our skies — period.

In the coming days, I will launch Americans for Safe Aerospace (ASA), a new advocacy organization for aerospace safety and national security. ASA will support pilots and other aerospace professionals who are reporting UAP. Our goal is to demand more disclosure from our public officials about this significant safety and national security problem. We will provide credible voices, public education, grassroots activism and lobbying on Capitol Hill to get answers about UAP.

President Biden needs to address this issue as transparently as possible. The White House should not conflate the low-tech objects that were recently shot down with unexplained high-tech, advanced objects witnessed by pilots. Our government needs to admit that it is possible another country has developed game-changing technology. We need to urgently address this threat by bringing together the best minds in our military, intelligence, science and tech sectors. If advanced UAP are not foreign drones, then we absolutely need a robust scientific inquiry into this mystery. Obfuscation and denial are a recipe for more conspiracy theories and greater distrust that stymie our search for the truth.

We need a coordinated, data-driven response that unites the public and private sectors. The North American Aerospace Defense Command, the U.S. Space Force and a host of other military and civilian agencies need to be marshaled in support of a much more aggressive and vigilant effort, along with our scientific community and private industry.


Right now, the pieces of the UAP puzzle are scattered across silos in the military, government and the private sector. We need to integrate and analyze these massive data sets with new methods like AI. We also need to make this data available to the best scientists outside of government.

We have strong supporters of more data sharing. Sen. Rubio has suggested the Pentagon’s All-domain Anomaly Resolution Office (AARO), which was set up by Congress last year, share its data on unidentified objects with academic institutions and civilian scientific organizations. The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and the Galileo Project at Harvard, tech startups like Enigma Labs, and traditional defense contractors could all play a role.

Unfortunately, all UAP reports and videos are classified, meaning active-duty pilots cannot come forward publicly and FOIA requests are denied. These are two major steps backwards for transparency, but they can be mitigated with data-sharing.

I am impressed by the recent whistleblower protections enacted last year to encourage more pilots and others to come forward, and I support the fresh push by Rubio and Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) for full funding of AARO. Given the stakes, Congress also needs to fund grants for more scientific inquiry of UAP.

Above all, we need to listen to pilots. Military and civilian pilots provide critical, first-hand insights into advanced UAP. Right now, the stigma attached to reporting UAP is still too strong. Since I came forward about UAP in 2019, only one other pilot from my squadron has gone public. Commercial pilots also face significant risks to their careers for doing so.

New rules are needed to require civilian pilots to report UAP, protect the pilots from retribution, and a process must be established for investigating their reports. Derision or denial over the unknown is unacceptable. This is a time for curiosity.

If the phenomena I witnessed with my own eyes turns out to be foreign drones, they pose an urgent threat to national security and airspace safety. If they are something else, it must be a scientific priority to find out.

https://www.politico.com/news/magazine/2023/02/28/ufo-uap-navy-intelligence-00084537

[Moderator edited to insert an attribution to the author of the above text.]
« Last Edit: March 01, 2023, 08:20:48 PM by burakkucat »
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Alex Atkin UK

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Re: The Phenomenon (2020)
« Reply #8 on: March 02, 2023, 09:04:40 AM »

Just seems a huge waste of money, its not a "problem" unless these things actually cause air collisions and if that ever happened we'd have a lot more proof of what they are.
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neil

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Re: The Phenomenon (2020)
« Reply #9 on: March 02, 2023, 05:37:17 PM »

Quote from: Christopher Mellon (former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Intelligence)
Quote
Can technology alone account for what you and I are discussing? It occurs to me that by day I make my living by speaking on SiriusXM and my voice is bouncing across the United States on a satellite. I assume right now this conversation doing likewise there’s a lot of stuff up in the atmosphere that didn’t used to be there can that be an explanation or is that too simplistic?

I do believe it’s too simplistic and the reason I say that is because in some of these cases, we have information from multiple radar systems, infrared systems, multiple naval personnel on the ground and in the air and we are tracking these objects performing maneuvers that clearly indicate they are under intelligent control. They are responding to our aircraft, they are out maneuvering them and they are doing things that are far beyond any capability we possess. So that’s certainly a hypothesis to consider. We have to keep an open mind going forward but I don’t think we are going to find at the end of the day that that kind of explanation can explain cases like that.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JcvI5zkP0pQ
« Last Edit: March 02, 2023, 05:39:20 PM by neil »
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Alex Atkin UK

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Re: The Phenomenon (2020)
« Reply #10 on: March 03, 2023, 12:31:35 AM »

The problem is they aren't just seemingly doing things which are "beyond what we can do", they are doing things that defy the laws of physics.  So at that point, its far easier to believe its bad tracking data, optical illusions due to atmospheric distortion, or outright faked, than our grasp on physics is somehow THAT flawed.
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anything