Kitz ADSL Broadband Information
adsl spacer  
Support this site
Home Broadband ISPs Tech Routers Wiki Forum
 
     
   Compare ISP   Rate your ISP
   Glossary   Glossary
 
Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

News:

Pages: 1 [2]

Author Topic: Routers - How secure?  (Read 846 times)

Weaver

  • Addicted Kitizen
  • *****
  • Posts: 9903
  • Retd s/w dev; A&A; 3x7km lines; Firebrick; IPv6
Re: Routers - How secure?
« Reply #15 on: June 07, 2021, 10:24:44 AM »

Way back then I used to run Windows Server 2003 on my large Dell workstation, just because it came with a somewhat hardened security configuration. That was even before DSL, to begin with.
Logged

bob.gas

  • Reg Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 250
Re: Routers - How secure?
« Reply #16 on: June 07, 2021, 10:39:27 AM »

Bob
What hardware have you got?
I guess its a mix of computers and WiFi devices


Hi SE.

my PC is an oldy I'm afraid (not sure if that'll make a difference or not?)
It's a Dell Optiplex 790.
It's a refurb, as when my other PC died I couldn't afford a brand new one, so took a chance on the Dell.
it's been fine to date (fingers crossed)

Spec....
Intel Core i5 2400 @ 3.10GHz
238GB Hitachi HX256GSSDSATA3 (SATA (SSD)
16GB Ram

A Talk talk Router wired to PC.

Canon Printer also wired

The only other wireless items is an Amazon Echo Dot and me & my wife phones.

   
« Last Edit: June 07, 2021, 10:43:49 AM by bob.gas »
Logged
Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you'#039#039re a mile away and you have their shoes

bob.gas

  • Reg Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 250
Re: Routers - How secure?
« Reply #17 on: June 07, 2021, 10:48:08 AM »

Just to add...
Thanks, guys for all your post's so far.
I'm afraid a lot of it is way over my head right now, so sorry if I haven't answered correctly (or at all)
I need to sit down and Google all the acronyms etc and educate myself. lol
Logged
Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you'#039#039re a mile away and you have their shoes

Weaver

  • Addicted Kitizen
  • *****
  • Posts: 9903
  • Retd s/w dev; A&A; 3x7km lines; Firebrick; IPv6
Re: Routers - How secure?
« Reply #18 on: June 07, 2021, 01:52:23 PM »

Any questions about acronyms and TLAs, do just ask. There will always be someone else who will benefit. Everyone had to start somewhere.
Logged

dslexpert

  • Just arrived
  • *
  • Posts: 10
Re: Routers - How secure?
« Reply #19 on: June 07, 2021, 02:11:30 PM »


The risk to routers is less likely to be a fault in the firewall's design but in the implementation. i.e. having a 'firewall' isn't any good if the firewall or its host device has a vulnerability.   It's impossible to make a product vulnerability free.  Some vendors may have vulnerabilities discovered or fixed more often than others (though that may relfect their popularity/market size rather than coder competence).   Vulnerabilities on routers can be caused by:

1. A coding error so that it doesn't work as designed.   Routers which use opensource or an easily decompiled code binary make it easy for a hacker to study the code and identify vulnerabilities.  That is a double edged sword - white hats can find laws but so can black hats.  Source examination or reverse engineering aren't the only methods though; some flaws are discovered by 3rd parties by trial and error.
2. Default WAN admin access.  Remote admin should be done through a VPN whenever possible (and if not, at least through a TLS/HTTPS connection).
3. A default admin password where the user is not encouraged to change it.  This is more likely a problem on ISP supplied routers where the router is pre-configured so they have no need to ever visit the router's GUI - it's plug and play so the user would never think of it.
4. Backdoor admin access. That makes the vendor's support easier, but also a hacker's access.
5. A flaw in a necessary industry standard protocol.  This isn't an error by the vendor but by the designers of a protocol that they need to follow (e.g. WEP).  In some cases it was an 'acceptable' flaw at the time of design because cracking it was impractical or impossible but a decade later, cracking older protocols becomes feasible with newer methods and greater consumer processing power.
6. Having ports 'open' isn't in itself a vulnerability.  It may identify an endpoint for a hacker but that's it so when GRC or whatever warns you that a service/port is "open" it just means 'responding'.  Your doorbell doesn't open your front door :-)
Logged
Pages: 1 [2]
 

anything