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Author Topic: Changing in-home wiring  (Read 1047 times)

Westie

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Changing in-home wiring
« on: January 17, 2019, 07:19:15 PM »

I intend to make some changes to the internal phone/broadband wiring in my 1985 property. I have a couple of questions before I go ahead, and I wonder if any of the esteemed forum members can assist me.

The current wiring scheme is as follows:
The BT drop cable enters the house into the rear of a flush-mounted 1-gang back box.
In the box, behind a blanking plate, two wires are gel-crimped to CW1308 cable (approx 2.5m long).
Then a LJU2/1A master socket.
Then CW 1308 cable (approx 15m).
Then a LJU2/3A secondary socket in the lounge (modem, router & DECT phone plugged in here).
Then CW1308 cable (approx 8.5m).
Then a LJU2/3A secondary socket.
(Two computers, NAS & printer are in an upstairs office, connected to the router via a switch and powerline adapters. Other devices connect to the router via WiFi.)
The modem & router are not in an ideal location, but there is no other telephone socket close to a power outlet.

My long-term aim is to relocate the modem or modem/router adjacent to where the drop cable enters the house and run an ethernet cable to the office, thereby eliminating the powerline adapters, but first I would have to install a new power socket. My plan is:

Stage 1: Terminate the drop cable at an Openreach branded NTE5A (2014 vintage) fitted to the back box. Reconnect the internal wiring to this and replace the LJU2/1A with a LJU2/3A. I already have the necessary 'bits'.
Stage 2: Fit an Openreach branded Mk3 interstitial plate to the NTE5A. Re-site the modem (& router) to the upstairs office, and connect to the A&B terminals on the Mk3 using CAT6 cable (approx 27m). Remove the powerline adapters.
Stage 3: Fit a power socket close to the NTE5A, re-site the modem alongside, and use the CAT6 cable from Stage 2 to establish an ethernet connection with the router in the office.

My questions are:
1. I know Stage 1 is not allowed unless I get BT to do it, but is it likely to cause any problems?
2. Will Stage 2 work?
3. Will the Mk3 stop the phone extensions acting as a bridge tap, and if not would there be any benefit from using a VDSL faceplate instead?
4. Will the Mk3 remove the need for a dangly filter on the DECT phone, and if so would it cause issues if I don't remove it? It's behind some heavy furniture, so I would prefer to leave the filter in place if it doesn't cause a problem.

I don't expect any immediate improvement in the broadband speed, as I am already syncing at the full contracted 40/10, and the biggest slowdown is due to congestion on the Vodafone backhaul in the evening. However, I would like the house network to not be a bottleneck for any future upgrade.

Thanks in anticipation,

George
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burakkucat

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Re: Changing in-home wiring
« Reply #1 on: January 17, 2019, 10:10:58 PM »

I've reviewed your plan and have slightly modified it, as follows --

Stage 1 -- That is perfectly sensible. Once the NTE5/A is in-situ, all the other wiring and sockets are your responsibility and would be connected via the IDCs on the back of the lower front face-plate.

Stage 2 -- I would recommend that you fit a Mk 3 SSFP (Service Specific Face Plate).

Stage 2.5 -- I would recommend that you fit a surface mounted 8P8C modular socket close to the NTE5/A with the Mk 3 SSFP. From that new 8P8C socket, run your CAT6 Ethernet structured cabling to another surface mounted 8P8C modular socket in the office. Whilst waiting for Stage 3 to be complete, link the top socket (8P8C) of the Mk 3 SSFP to the newly provided socket with a standard Ethernet patch cable. In the office, use a patch cable to connect from the new socket to the modem. It should be twisted pair with an 8P2C plug (pins 4 & 5) at the new socket end and a 6P2C plug (pins 3 & 4) at the modem end.

Stage 3 -- Have an new mains supply double-gang socket fitted near to the NTE5/A and Mk 3 SSFP.

Stage 3.5 -- Relocate the modem next to the NTE5/A and Mk 3 SSFP. Unplug the Ethernet patch lead from the top socket of the Mk 3 SSFP and plug it into relevant port of the modem. Link the top socket (8P8C) of the Mk 3 SSFP to the xDSL port of the modem with an appropriate length patch cable. (Re-use the patch cable from Stage 2.5)

You can certainly leave the existing rat's tail micro-filter in situ, behind the heavy furniture. It will not cause any problem.
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Westie

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Re: Changing in-home wiring
« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2019, 11:54:07 PM »

Thanks burakkucat. I think the Mk SSFP is what I meant when I said "Openreach branded Mk3 interstitial plate" in Stage 2.  It certainly looks like this. The VDSL faceplace I was referring to was this, but did BT discontinue them when the Mk 3 SSFP was introduced?

I thought that on the Mk 3 SSFP the IDCs marked AB are connected to the centre pins on the 8P8C socket, but is this true, or is there some 'secret sauce' between them? For Stage 2/2.5 it would be a much neater job to hard-wire the CAT6 cable through the existing mini trunking that houses the CW1308 cable. Obviously this wouldn't work for stage 3, but at that time I would re-terminate the CAT6 cable to a surface mounted 8P8C socket, with the modem's input from the top socket of the Mk 3 SSFP, and its output to the new structured cabling socket.

Your Stage 3 and Stage 3.5 were exactly what I had in mind long term. However, fitting a new double-gang mains socket will require a degree of disruption to the household that is not possible at the moment. Stage 1 can be done in just a few minutes, but if I can't achieve Stage 2 without adding an extra socket near the NTE5/A I'll skip it altogether and wait until I get the new mains sockets installed.

Thanks for the confirmation about the filter. The furniture will need to be moved to redecorate, but I was NOT looking forward to having to do it any sooner than necessary!
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burakkucat

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Re: Changing in-home wiring
« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2019, 12:10:55 AM »

I think the Mk SSFP is what I meant when I said "Openreach branded Mk3 interstitial plate" in Stage 2.  It certainly looks like this.

Yes, that's the one.

Quote
The VDSL faceplace I was referring to was this, but did BT discontinue them when the Mk 3 SSFP was introduced?

That is/was not a BT Group product but something created by a third-party. I would avoid such devices.

Quote
I thought that on the Mk 3 SSFP the IDCs marked AB are connected to the centre pins on the 8P8C socket,

Yes, that is correct. The A & B IDCs are pins 4 & 5 of the 8P8C socket.

Quote
For Stage 2/2.5 it would be a much neater job to hard-wire the CAT6 cable through the existing mini trunking that houses the CW1308 cable. Obviously this wouldn't work for stage 3, but at that time I would re-terminate the CAT6 cable to a surface mounted 8P8C socket, with the modem's input from the top socket of the Mk 3 SSFP, and its output to the new structured cabling socket.

As you appreciate, it is difficult to make a complete recommendation without knowledge of all those other little facts. Just modify the plan to suit your current requirements and to allow for future modifications so that the ultimate aim can be achieved.
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Westie

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Re: Changing in-home wiring
« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2019, 12:31:59 AM »

Yes, that is correct. The A & B IDCs are pins 4 & 5 of the 8P8C socket.

Thanks, that's a relief.

Quote
As you appreciate, it is difficult to make a complete recommendation without knowledge of all those other little facts.

That is very true, and sometimes little facts can have enormous consequences when omitted!
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Westie

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Re: Changing in-home wiring
« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2019, 12:19:18 AM »

An update:
Stage 1 (fit NTE5/A) took max attainable sync rate from 50924/18897 to 55588/19736.
Stage 2 (fit SSFP & relocate modem/router upstairs) took it to 82540/25870.
Stage 3 has been put on hold due to other commitments.

I'm still contracted at 40/10, but now I've sorted the internal broadband issues I will probably reinstate the SamKnows whitebox to get data about the ISP-related ones.

Thanks again for the help & advice.
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burakkucat

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Re: Changing in-home wiring
« Reply #6 on: February 01, 2019, 01:23:26 AM »

That is an excellent result. Well worth the effort.  :)

Thank you for providing the update.
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tubaman

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Re: Changing in-home wiring
« Reply #7 on: February 01, 2019, 08:38:35 AM »

That's a really good result.
A lot of people say 'how much difference can the few feet of wiring in my house make', and I think you've just answered that question very well indeed.
 :)
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