Kitz ADSL Broadband Information
adsl spacer  
Support this site
Home Broadband ISPs Tech Routers Wiki Forum
 
     
   Compare ISP   Rate your ISP
 
Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

News:

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5

Author Topic: IPv6 - where are we now?  (Read 1907 times)

Bowdon

  • Content Team
  • Kitizen
  • *
  • Posts: 1595
Re: IPv6 - where are we now?
« Reply #30 on: June 16, 2018, 01:17:59 PM »

My modem shows it does.
The Netflix app also shows IPV6.

I had a search around for netflix on ps4 with ipv6 and found this thread : https://community.playstation.com/content/pdc/us/en_US/pdc-communities/playstation-general.topic.html/ipv6_psn_and_youc-bUKX.html

It seems that at some level the ps4 does have a basic ipv6 function. But its not being utilised, even though the ipv6 is assigned to it.

I did an experiment like someone said at the end message on the first page. I went to http://ipv6-test.com/ using the ps4 pro browser and it came back that it didn't have ipv6. I then booted up the xbox one x browser and went to that page. It passed fully with ipv6.
Logged
BT Infinity 2 - Smart Hub 6 - ECI Cab

j0hn

  • Kitizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1588
Re: IPv6 - where are we now?
« Reply #31 on: June 16, 2018, 01:42:40 PM »

Pretty much what I said above.
The hardware supports it. It obtains an IPV6 address.
PSN just need to enable it on their servers.

It will only really help those with NAT issue on IPV4. Obviously not a priority for Sony.

That threads nearly 4 years old so I wouldn't hold my breath on it being enabled anytime soon.
Logged
BT FTTC 55/10 ECI now Huawei cab
Zyxel VMG1312-B10A bridge mode with 1508 MTU + Asus RT-AC68U running Asuswrt-Merlin

Chrysalis

  • Content Team
  • Addicted Kitizen
  • *
  • Posts: 5404
Re: IPv6 - where are we now?
« Reply #32 on: June 16, 2018, 04:38:20 PM »

ipv6-test.com is nothing to do with PSN servers tho.

The issue is really with sony been stuck in the stone age and not implementing support for it on the sony OS.

However with large isps like VM considering ISP side NAT on ipv4, it might wake them up.
Logged
Sky Fiber Pro - Billion 8800NL bridge & PFSense BOX running PFSense 2.4 - ECI Cab - LINE STATISTICS CLICK HERE

Weaver

  • Addicted Kitizen
  • *****
  • Posts: 5432
  • Retd sw dev; A&A; 3 × 7km ADSL2; IPv6; Firebrick
Re: IPv6 - where are we now?
« Reply #33 on: June 16, 2018, 10:52:56 PM »

Rather than stupid ISP-side NAT with IPv4 it is possible for IPv6-only users to access IPv4 servers out on the internet. I think it might be called something like Trick-or-Treat, but I really do not remember.
Logged

jelv

  • Helpful
  • Reg Member
  • *
  • Posts: 863
Re: IPv6 - where are we now?
« Reply #34 on: June 17, 2018, 08:38:38 AM »

Surely that must do ISP NAT? It must present an IPv4 address to the server you are trying to contact and that can only be allocated by the gateway.
Logged
Programming today is a race between software engineers striving to build bigger and better idiot-proof programs, and the Universe trying to produce bigger and better idiots. So far, the Universe is winning. Rick Cook, The Wizardry Compiled

Weaver

  • Addicted Kitizen
  • *****
  • Posts: 5432
  • Retd sw dev; A&A; 3 × 7km ADSL2; IPv6; Firebrick
Re: IPv6 - where are we now?
« Reply #35 on: June 17, 2018, 10:56:58 AM »

Indeed it is NAT but done with IPv6 not with IPv4. A server at the ISP generates lies in the responses to DNS lookups so the doing a DNS lookup for an IPv4-only server gets lied to and told that the IPv4-only server in question has an IPv6 address. That IPv6 address is that of the protocol converter box at the ISP. The ISP has to then convert the outgoing requesting into IPv4 using some IPv4 source address owned by the ISP assigned to the protocol converter box. So this has the some of the same problems as NAT in IPv4, one being the problem where a client mentions its own address in the messages it exchanges with the machine at the other end. The terms DNS64 and NAT64 are used to describe this trickery. It often works well enough in practice so I am told. A small number of Andrews and Arnold users are using it in order to go completely IPv6-only.

Apparently Microsoft’s internal corporate network is well on the way to going completely IPv6 only and this has meant putting the screws in some equipment suppliers to get them to fix awful stupid bugs. They have found that some kit can speak IPv6 but actually freaks out occasionally in a truly IPv6-only environment. Microsoft is fed up with having to do everything wide, like security policy twice and firewalling config twice with more than twice the risk of screwing it up because one side may never actually get tested properly. They offer an isolated guest WLAN for visitors so that the visitors can contact their home base, and lots of the visitors have been moaning because their kit or software, particularly VPNs and firewall-related systems freak out when they have only IPv6 even though they thought they were good with IPv6 because IPv6 traffic had been successfully flowing and might even have become preferred yet when IPv4 was taken away they found that some small stupid things were still relying on it. So some of these visitors were moaning. That then meant that Microsoft’s network engineers needed to lean on suppliers to get fixes done pdq. Microsoft is probably sufficiently enormous that they have enough muscle to get suppliers to actually get on and make required changes and not take a year or so about it.
Logged

Weaver

  • Addicted Kitizen
  • *****
  • Posts: 5432
  • Retd sw dev; A&A; 3 × 7km ADSL2; IPv6; Firebrick
Re: IPv6 - where are we now?
« Reply #36 on: June 17, 2018, 11:00:34 AM »

* So how many Kitizens does that make, I need to do another count?

* Anyone else want to put their hand up?

* And which ISPs do we have now?

Zen took an absolute age to pull their finger out. `that is one reason why after using them for a year I did not go with them, because I got fed up with the excuses, vague muttering and the waiting for IPv6. It was a good job I didn't wait any longer because it took them another five years or something like that. Does anyone know what the story is with Zen?
Logged

roseway

  • Administrator
  • Senior Kitizen
  • *
  • Posts: 39206
  • Penguins CAN fly
    • DSLstats
Re: IPv6 - where are we now?
« Reply #37 on: June 17, 2018, 11:33:48 AM »

As I mentioned, I'm migrating to IDNet on the 26th June. Once I'm up and running on IPv4 I'll be enabling IPv6, and the runes suggest it should be straightforward.
Logged
  Eric

Weaver

  • Addicted Kitizen
  • *****
  • Posts: 5432
  • Retd sw dev; A&A; 3 × 7km ADSL2; IPv6; Firebrick
Re: IPv6 - where are we now?
« Reply #38 on: June 17, 2018, 12:36:42 PM »

With a modern router it is just a piece of cake because every modern o/s even going back as far as twelve years ago supports IPv6 very well indeed, as do all modern web browsers going back to then. Facebook is all IPv6 internally. Google speaks IPv6. A huge number of other similar networks have been speaking IPv6 ever since World IPv6 Launch Day in 2012 when the participants switched on IPv6 permanently.

My own personal domains, their DNS and my email servers are all IPv6.

However, confession time: I am too confused and fatigued to maintain a proper personal website there is the rotten apple in that there is an A record pointing to an IPv4-only web server.
Logged

highpriest

  • Reg Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 222
Re: IPv6 - where are we now?
« Reply #39 on: June 17, 2018, 12:43:44 PM »

Native IPv6 with Zen. /48 prefix. All works brilliantly.
Logged
Zen | Huawei HG612 3B Bridge | EdgeRouter PoE | UniFi AP AC Pro + Lite

Jon21

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 59
Re: IPv6 - where are we now?
« Reply #40 on: June 17, 2018, 01:12:30 PM »

Native IPv6 here with AAISP
Logged

Weaver

  • Addicted Kitizen
  • *****
  • Posts: 5432
  • Retd sw dev; A&A; 3 × 7km ADSL2; IPv6; Firebrick
Re: IPv6 - where are we now?
« Reply #41 on: June 17, 2018, 01:24:24 PM »

I am not really sure why ISPs are giving out /48s to customers, even domestic ones all the time. It is rather worrying. At that rate we could be starting to eat the IPv6 address space up after a few decades because of the sheer amount of wasteage. Mind you a change of heart means that the remaining space could be allocated much more responsibly by a policy change later on.

I would have thought that a /60 would be good for most domestic users and a /56 for small businesses unless they have serious expansion plans or there is some risk that they could expand because having to renumber your network because of short-sighted allocation in the first place is fairly unforgivable in my view. Renumbering is just hassle we do not need and a total waste of time and money.

I doubt that I will ever end up with 16 sites or LANs, but in case there could be some phenomenon or development that I cannot see at the moment then perhaps a /56 for me would be slightly safer.  But unless I become some kind of vast corporate one day, how am I ever going to end up with 65535 LANs / sites?

Am I just not getting it? AA the ISP has a /32 and that is the standard allocation for an ISP. (I would have thought that some organisations would want some contiguous ones to make a slightly shorter prefix - bigger contiguous address space so as to keep firewalling and aggregation nice and neat.) Basically that means that, unless there are some mini-ISPs, ISPs or other organisations that get a smaller allocation, have to share a /32 each taking a subset of it = getting a longer prefix, then there will only be room for something rather less than 232 ISPs, a bit like the old IPv4 internet but with the unit being 1 ISP not one tin box.

And AA can only have 64k customers then if they are always giving every one a /48 whether they need it or not. If they start to run out then they will have to reduce the over-generous allocation massively, reducing it to /56 gives them room for 256 times more customers or they could start handing out /60s ie 4096 times more customers something like room for 128 million if they changed over st the halfway point.

I wonder what the big ISPs are doing. The likes of BT are going to have to do something more sensible either now or in the future unless they either start out with a bigger allocation from RIPE than a /32, or else they do not follow the standard IMHO dumb advice of giving every user a /48 willy-nilly. I think even BT can work out that they need a lot more than 64k customers, and giving out /56s gives them what 16 million customers which might be risky so if I were BT I would try and get a bigger subnet than a /32 and give out /60s and /56s with /48s to business users who are actual companies or users who have any risk at all of serious growth.
Logged

highpriest

  • Reg Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 222
Re: IPv6 - where are we now?
« Reply #42 on: June 17, 2018, 01:32:02 PM »

I agree. There is no reason that I will need 65,536 /64 networks at home. Even the largest enterprises won't need that many. Anything more than a /60 for an EU is just wasteful.
Logged
Zen | Huawei HG612 3B Bridge | EdgeRouter PoE | UniFi AP AC Pro + Lite

Chrysalis

  • Content Team
  • Addicted Kitizen
  • *
  • Posts: 5404
Re: IPv6 - where are we now?
« Reply #43 on: June 18, 2018, 09:08:59 AM »

Weaver I had the same thoughts.

These are what I concluded after I watched videos about these questions been raised to the ipv6 architects and responses given back by isp's.

1 - The reason /64 is the smallest prefix is that if there was smaller prefixes then routing tables would get overloaded.
2 - In reference to isp's giving out things like /48 to consumers? No reasonable answer has been provided, so I consider it akin to the early days of ipv4 where the attitude was everything is plentiful so its fine.
3 - Sky have given a reason for providing a /56 instead of a /64, their reason was in the future they want the option to split the ipv6 internally on their customers networks for network segregation, guest wifi etc, things like that I am assuming. since /64 is the smallest prefix, then /56 would be required for them to do that.
Logged
Sky Fiber Pro - Billion 8800NL bridge & PFSense BOX running PFSense 2.4 - ECI Cab - LINE STATISTICS CLICK HERE

chenks

  • Reg Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 314
Re: IPv6 - where are we now?
« Reply #44 on: June 18, 2018, 09:25:39 AM »

plusnet (obviously) don't currently support IPv6.
i would happily move to an ISP that did if they could provide me with the same service i currently get at the same price point, however as of yet i've not found any

they would need to provide me
80/20 FTTC
totally unlimited
1 static IP address
allow use of any modem/router
sub-£20pm for just the FTTC
not stipulate that i must also have voice service with them

i can usually find an ISP that can give some of those requirements, but never all of them, and almost none at that price point regardless of requirements.
« Last Edit: June 18, 2018, 10:04:30 AM by chenks »
Logged
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5