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Author Topic: IPv6 - where are we now?  (Read 1906 times)

jelv

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Re: IPv6 - where are we now?
« Reply #15 on: June 13, 2018, 02:56:54 PM »

Sorry if this is noobish but what are the benefits with IPv6 ?
You'll start to miss out when there are more sites like this one: http://loopsofzen.co.uk
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St3

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Re: IPv6 - where are we now?
« Reply #16 on: June 13, 2018, 03:02:44 PM »

Aint working  :P
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renluop

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Re: IPv6 - where are we now?
« Reply #17 on: June 13, 2018, 03:08:16 PM »

http://www.ipv6now.com.au/whyipv6.php
From your link
Quote
3.4 x 1038 = 340 trillion trillion trillion addresses - about 670 quadrillion addresses per square millimetre of the Earth's surface.
Is that worse than being covered in concrete, like the NIMBYs shout about building ;D?
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chenks

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Re: IPv6 - where are we now?
« Reply #18 on: June 13, 2018, 03:37:02 PM »

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licquorice

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Re: IPv6 - where are we now?
« Reply #19 on: June 13, 2018, 03:52:24 PM »

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chenks

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Re: IPv6 - where are we now?
« Reply #20 on: June 13, 2018, 04:06:50 PM »

although with an IPv6 tunnel that is easily fixed.
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jelv

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Re: IPv6 - where are we now?
« Reply #21 on: June 13, 2018, 05:58:24 PM »

Aint working  :P

That's because your ISP is not providing full internet access and is not allowing you to access the IP address 2001:8b0:0:30::666:102
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Programming today is a race between software engineers striving to build bigger and better idiot-proof programs, and the Universe trying to produce bigger and better idiots. So far, the Universe is winning. Rick Cook, The Wizardry Compiled

Bowdon

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Re: IPv6 - where are we now?
« Reply #22 on: June 13, 2018, 07:52:12 PM »

The PS4 does work with IPV6.
My PS4 obtains an IPV6 address when I connect it to my network.

They just haven't made PSN work with IPV6 yet.
The hardware supports it though, it just need turned on.

How do you know it does?

I've not seen anyone else say the PS4 obtains a IPv6 address to be able to connect online.

On the View Connection Status it only lists a IPv4 address.

On the Xbox One X it lists both IPv4 and IPv6 addresses.
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Weaver

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Re: IPv6 - where are we now?
« Reply #23 on: June 13, 2018, 10:40:19 PM »

There are a lot of technical benefits with IPv6 but those mainly affect software designers and sysadmins. Some of them are the end of NAT so that peer-to-peer apps work and more reliable initialisation on the LAN with no need for dhcp and full use of link-local addresses, also all apps tend to have multiple addresses per interface. Privacy addresses help errm privacy.

Users will never notice any difference. IPv6 is ~1.4% slower (because of increased header size).

In the future IPv4-only users may start to find there are more and more services that they cannot access, but this may in some cases be covered up by the placement of translation boxes.

As some of you found out just now, there are already some nodes that you cannot reach if you are ISP-only, but very few, so indeed as mentioned earlier, your ISP is not giving you a full service to “the internet”, well there have been two internets for a long time of course, over 15 years.

Most software defaults to using the IPv6 internet (why?) if it has a choice of ways to access a destination. If you use say Google or Facebook and you have IPv6 then your software will most likely be using IPv6 to talk to them exclusively.
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Bowdon

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Re: IPv6 - where are we now?
« Reply #24 on: June 14, 2018, 11:16:05 AM »

Is it possible to release a firmware update for devices to allow them to be IPv6 compatible?

If its not possible then thats going to be a lot of Internet oriented devices become useless.
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chenks

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Re: IPv6 - where are we now?
« Reply #25 on: June 14, 2018, 11:48:48 AM »

Is it possible to release a firmware update for devices to allow them to be IPv6 compatible?

If its not possible then thats going to be a lot of Internet oriented devices become useless.

everything is possible, but whether it is worth the time and money to write and test an update is the real question.
the vast majority of home routers have a limited lifespan, and are not worth spending any time or money on at all.
it'll be more cost effective to simply replace than to patch and update.
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jelv

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Re: IPv6 - where are we now?
« Reply #26 on: June 14, 2018, 12:31:48 PM »

Why patch them when the ISPs can make money (directly or indirectly) by replacements? For example when Plusnet launch IPv6 they could say they are giving out IPv6 enabled routers for the cost of postage only - but only if the user agrees to a new 18 month contract.
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Weaver

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Re: IPv6 - where are we now?
« Reply #27 on: June 14, 2018, 12:53:43 PM »

@Bowdon

Probably it is. I seem to remember seeing one model of expensive device that was upgraded by a software change. There is nothing that requires hardware changes for IPv6, it is all a matter or software, unless you have hardware acceleration in the device that is tied to IPv4 and which will be useless when presented with IPv6 because it doesn't understand the addresses or the protocol header formats. Stuff to do longest-prefix-match for routing, or content-addressable / associative memory, firewall matching accelerators that kind of thing. Indeed the bugs in the HG612, ZyXEL modem-routers and other devices that are all caused by their common Broadcom core hardware and software components, mentioned in other threads recently, were I think linked to hardware accelerators.

There are several things: firstly the new combined IPv4+IPv6 protocol stack, where IPv4 behaviour is sometimes upgraded in that it is handled using the enhanced algorithms used for IPv6. This happened in Windows Vista: WinXp had IPv6 code that was rather separate from the unchanged existing IPv4 code and was like an add-on, but in Vista from what I understand the whole lot was thrown out and a new combined piece of code based on IPv6 new wisdom was used to handle both, in the same way, as far as possible. The second thing is the matter of dealing with the awkward details of having two protocols and selecting which to use. Aside from the o/s: Web browsers have had to deal with the question of what to do if someone has a rubbish tunnelled IPv6 service and although the general opinion seems to be that IPv6 should be preferred (why?) then if it turns out to be rubbish the application needs to change its mind and go for IPv4. So it is a matter of which actually works. Some web browsers race the two protocols and whichever is the fastest to get started up wins. Quite a bit has been written about this. This issue could affect an o/s http library though and also can affect DNS where you may have a choice of which protocol to use to do DNS lookups.

Thirdly, the whole business of acquiring IPv6 addresses is different, with robust auto-config and no more reliance on DHCP or manual static configuration. ARP is rena

IPv6 mandates support for IPSEC, which is something new. I don't know how many o/s designer follow this ruling though. Mobile IPv6 is very nice (where you can move from one subnet to another and keep the same IPv6 addresses so that conversations/flows remain unbroken), the result of a lot of thought. However not so many operating systems seem to have it. Systems developed in the far east seem to be more enthusiastic.

Systems also have to get their minds right because multiple IP addresses per individuainterface are now commonplace.

Because IPv6 link-local addresses are now supported properly and handled properly by operating systems and apps (even though there is a link-local address range for IPv4 169.254.0.0/16 RFC 3927 it was more than a tad too late, and designers do not know how to handle it, whether to treat it as special, the way it should be, or not) there is now for the first time the issue of duplicate matching link-local addresses on different interfaces in the same machine. Apps and operatingsystems need some way to talk about these unambiguously or else there is chaos. Scope identifiers are used for this. Microsoft use the syntax eg fe80:db8::b011:0c5%8 when externalising IP addresses where the part after the percent sign is the interface identifier, an index into a table of attached interfaces.

At L5 and above, web browsers, web servers and operating systems’ http subsystems have had to deal with the embarrassment that a colon in a URL already means something, it is syntactically a ‘taken’ character, because it is already used for a port number, and in a numeric IPv6 address, hex digits can look like a domain name so numeric IPv6 addresses have to be wrapped in [ ] eg http://[2001:db8::]:8080/whatever. This required a new web standard, enhancing the spec of the syntax of the URL.

Manufacturers want to encourage new sales, so little incentive to upgrade software. Also because so many home routers nowadays include wireless that makes them become dated after a while and it is that which tends to push people towards upgrading, the continual innovation in wireless LAN technologies, fantastic things such as beamforming, better MIMO, higher speeds and enhanced multi-WAP coordination and handover protocols and goodness knows what else.
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j0hn

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Re: IPv6 - where are we now?
« Reply #28 on: June 14, 2018, 04:25:33 PM »

How do you know it does?

I've not seen anyone else say the PS4 obtains a IPv6 address to be able to connect online.

On the View Connection Status it only lists a IPv4 address.

On the Xbox One X it lists both IPv4 and IPv6 addresses.
My modem shows it does.
The Netflix app also shows IPV6.
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Chrysalis

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Re: IPv6 - where are we now?
« Reply #29 on: June 14, 2018, 04:32:35 PM »

Native with sky, and before that had it native with plusnet on their trial.

VM are rolling it out soon, but using some form of tunneling for ipv4 with it, so its gonna get interesting for VM customers.
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