Kitz ADSL Broadband Information
adsl spacer  
Support this site
Home Broadband ISPs Tech Routers Wiki Forum
 
     
   Compare ISP   Rate your ISP
 
Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

News:

Author Topic: 5G mmWave for fixed line: FTTP's stalking horse  (Read 751 times)

WWWombat

  • Kitizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1674
5G mmWave for fixed line: FTTP's stalking horse
« on: December 09, 2017, 11:19:35 AM »

The killer alternative to FTTP (putting fibre in the ground, and to every house), will be found if you don't need to put fibre to every house. That's the reason for interest in G.Fast, but it is also reason for interest in 5G mmWave technology too. Ask Google Fiber.

Now it looks like mmWave has got its own "long range" boost, and can be used to get gigabit speeds to 600m.

Verizon have been testing to get the results above, and now look like they will be using 5G mmWave to expand their operations into new cities in AT&T territory (which, incidentally, might be why AT&T want G.Fast to work over coax).

http://wirelessone.news/mimo-2/937-verizon-5g-every-variable-tested-during-the-trials-came-out-better-than-assumed

Quote
A year ago, most experts expected mmWave to be limited to 150-250 meters. Earlier this year, Verizon mentioned good results at 400 meters. Now, Verizon is often seeing excellent results to 600 meters and further. A gigabit is common.

Will we start seeing masts built next to each G.Fast pod here? Or just antenna bolted onto the nearest street lamp?
Logged

WWWombat

  • Kitizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1674
Re: 5G mmWave for fixed line: FTTP's stalking horse
« Reply #1 on: December 09, 2017, 11:25:23 AM »

Unfortunately for the UK (and Europe), "The Business Case Isn't There."

As Dave mentions in that article, Verizon are essentially after new customers, which will fund the new network. In Europe (including the UK), any such network would force competition for existing customers ... so would be harder to find funding for.

With Verizon looking at deployments in 2018, the UK might be looking at proper deployment levels in 2022-24 (even if it hits the news in 2020).
Logged

WWWombat

  • Kitizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1674
Re: 5G mmWave for fixed line: FTTP's stalking horse
« Reply #2 on: December 09, 2017, 11:39:41 AM »

Incidentally, that site has a good article on adding capacity to cells networks, either through adding more cells & masts (as mmWave would need), adding more spectrum, or adding more antenna.

The third option, more antenna, is the cheapest ... which probably explains why the UK/Europe might be more interested in 5G's using of "massive MIMO" instead of mmWave. Here's the alternative PR, showing where the investment money in the UK is more likely to be going in 2020: http://massivemimo.rocks/43-england-france-and-germany-promise-massive-mimo

Edit: Note that I suspect this is a good enough improvement for UK operators to improve speeds to their mobile customers, I'm not so sure it will give them enough to offer fixed-line alternative services.
Logged

Ignitionnet

  • Reg Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 794
Re: 5G mmWave for fixed line: FTTP's stalking horse
« Reply #3 on: December 11, 2017, 12:06:35 PM »

Apartment buildings in the states have coax all over the place. Being able to send G.fast down it saves a few dollars from having to get fibre to each unit.

Claim gigabit coverage without some of the expense, job done.

Verizon have lots of mobile coverage in areas where AT&T are the incumbent so all good fun.
Logged

Bowdon

  • Content Team
  • Kitizen
  • *
  • Posts: 1547
Re: 5G mmWave for fixed line: FTTP's stalking horse
« Reply #4 on: December 15, 2017, 06:50:55 PM »

I'm assuming 5G mmWave technology is like 4G and 3G technologies i.e. usually used with cell phone networks?

I was wondering what is the ping like in those kind of technologies? Will 5G give as low a ping as fttp or fttc technology?
Logged
BT Infinity 2 - Smart Hub 6 - ECI Cab

WWWombat

  • Kitizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1674
Re: 5G mmWave for fixed line: FTTP's stalking horse
« Reply #5 on: December 16, 2017, 01:15:29 AM »

I'm assuming 5G mmWave technology is like 4G and 3G technologies i.e. usually used with cell phone networks?

5G is probably going to end up in licenced spectrum, so will be more likely to be seen with commercial mobile operators. Not all 5G will be "mmwave".

"mmwave" is a term that matches frequencies in the 30 - 300GHz range. Rather high frequencies, with relatively short range. It will require a lot more masts or cell sites, so isn't likely to appear on day 1. It might end up needing base stations at each street, or on many lampposts or telegraph poles.

But a lot of cell sites will certainly add capacity.

I was wondering what is the ping like in those kind of technologies? Will 5G give as low a ping as fttp or fttc technology?

A good question. One of the links in my posts mention that EE's tests have had sub-5ms latency, end to end, which I guess qualifies.

I vaguely recall that I've seen one aim for 5G states 1ms latency, but that is seen as a "far-future" by operators.
Logged
 

anything