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Author Topic: Intalling overhead dropwire from pole to property  (Read 3703 times)

Aarron

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Intalling overhead dropwire from pole to property
« on: October 25, 2014, 07:54:05 PM »

Hi,

I've been trying to find information out for a while on the best practice of installing dropwire from the pole to the property.

If theres any installers out there who wouldnt mind giving me some advice I would greatly appreciate it. I work in the telecoms industry but not in this area and hope to obtain a job in this line of work so trying to update my knowledge.

Many thanks
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Ezzer

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Re: Intalling overhead dropwire from pole to property
« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2014, 08:27:38 PM »

Anything in particular ? This is a Huge subject with lots and lot and lots of variables

Whats there already?
The most likely route up to the property?
where's the DP?
what type of DP?
what type of pole / fittings?
Is the pole a "D" pole
height of the pole, height of the property?
are both on the same level?
whats the capacity of the pole, how many drop wires are there already and are they al in the same direction?
Are the existing wires above the required height?
can you access the property & the pole?
do you need a hoist?
is it a shared user pole (electricity)?
is there enough clearance to fit telecoms outside the required distance to the electrical.?
what's under the drop wire route?
how many lines are you installing, what drop wire to use?
is there a road? what type? whats the clearance required?
any obstructions? trees, buildings, ponds , other overhead services.
where are you looking to feed the service into the property
where are you looking to attatch to the building?
is it a listed building?
what material are you going to attatch to?
that bracket or eyebolt do you need?
can you do a drip loop?
whats the condition the the property material?
any osbtructions to access the property?
are you crossing other properties?
any obstructions along the lead-in?
Is that dog friendly!
how can you attatch the lead-in?
do you need to change the lead-in?
is there a block terminal on the property? do you use it, change it get rid of it?
can you get a nice neat attatchment and lead-in?
where's my cup of tea?
Is it a thatched roof?
will you need pin plugs (if its pebbledash start crying now)?
is the existing lead-in going through a window/door frame, yes, then you'll have to move it?
can you cleat along the motar or do you need to cleat to brick?
any pipes, electrical, vegitation along the lead-in route?
where can you go through the wall?
what materials are you going through?
can you do a drip loop?
can you drill from inside out? do you know where the drill is going to come out?
any electrical/gas or water potentaly in the way?
can you drill at a 15 degree angle?
what insulation is there, how can you get the lead-in pushed through?
how can you seal it?
how is the lead-in going to appear inside? straight to a NTE, a BT or run along a wall, skirting. behind a radiator?
whats the material inside?
what condition?
what traffic will there be past the cable/BT/NTE?
any pets with chewing habits?
will doors still open?
etc etc etc
 
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Black Sheep

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Re: Intalling overhead dropwire from pole to property
« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2014, 08:42:43 PM »

As Ezz has succinctly pointed out, the considerations in erecting Dropwires are huge. Not only do you have to satisfy 'H&S Regs' and 'Signing, Lighting and Guarding regs', but also BTOR's own 'Quality Standards'.
All the while paying close attention to aesthetics and the EU's preferences as to how they may want the Dropwire run ?.

Although each job is different, you soon get an eye for what will be the best method.

The main points are ....... is the pole climbable, is it within 68mtrs of the premises, what is the fabric of the building to ensure the correct fixing method, the height of the wire above any carriageway with vehicular access, (minimum height is 5.9mtrs, but you can erect at 5.5mtrs but have to submit a ticket for remedial work such as a longer pole to be put in place) .......... and most importantly safety to the public and yourself.

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Aarron

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Re: Intalling overhead dropwire from pole to property
« Reply #3 on: November 06, 2014, 12:48:07 PM »

Thank you greatly for the information guys, seems a lot of things to consider. If you don't mind, I'd like to know what the best process is for actually installing the cable from the pole to the property.

i.e.
Where is the best start position (property or pole)?
Are Bracket 22's still used or is it only eyebolts (if both, whats the difference)?
What type of termination is used in the black box at the top of a pole (I've been trying to search for a picture but with no luck)?

In regards to your comments, I have a few follow up questions (please forgive my lack of knowledge).
You said 'What type of DP' are there different types?
What variations of poles are there and what differences are there in the fittings?
What the maximum capacity for a pole?
You mentioned 'is the existing lead-in going through a window/door frame, yes, then you'll have to move it' whats the reason for this?
You said 'what insulation is there, how can you get the lead-in pushed through?' Whats the best way around this?

When it comes to the positioning of the NTE, does the customer have the final say or is there a set criteria as to where it can go?

Thanks in advance
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Ezzer

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Re: Intalling overhead dropwire from pole to property
« Reply #4 on: November 06, 2014, 08:16:48 PM »

Bracket 22 tend to be used where you need to fix to materials like wood. I prefered Eye bolts, its a firmer way of fixing. Less likely to cause issues in the future with things like bargeboard and gutter replacements. Theres that potental for an unrelated contractor charging the home owner extra as they have to work around the drop wire thats attatched to what their working on.

With eye bolts, a 10mm hole in the centre of a whole brick. 3 bricks down or more from the very top of a brick wall, and 2 bricks in from the end. A tiny upward angle to the hole drilled, minimised a pool of water build up which can freeze in winter causing the brick to crack.
keep the eye of the bolt as close to the brick face as possible, Looks neater and a bit stronger. Once you turn the bolt finger tight, 2 and a half turns on the nut with a spanner, too much risks cracking the brick now or soon in the future.
If the drop wire is perpendicular to the brick or within 30 degrees of the perpendicular (so pulling the bolt out of the hole) drill the hole about to the side, about 10 degrees to the perpendicular.
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Aarron

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Re: Intalling overhead dropwire from pole to property
« Reply #5 on: November 08, 2014, 02:50:11 PM »

Cheers, so when connecting the cable would you connect it to the property first using the Bracket 22 or Eyebolt and then carry it up the pole? Do you do a drip loop at the pole and property? Thanks
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Ezzer

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Re: Intalling overhead dropwire from pole to property
« Reply #6 on: November 14, 2014, 09:56:41 PM »

typically aim to have the dispenser at the pole as it can be strapped to the pole, and bring the drop wire to the property.
Eye bolt if you can as 1st option assuming there isnt some attatchment already there. Drip loops apply to the property, one from the clamp so water along the wire dosnt concentrate down the same specific part of the property, causing a green mark to form on the wall.
working this way means you can attatch the lead-in working your way down, which is much easier and helps make a neat straight line. Cleats on the vertical @ 450mm spacing (1 1/2 hammer lenghts), horizontal runs at 300mm spacing (one hammer lenght), unless the wall is very soft, then more cleats.

Check if the building if listed with restictions, do you need a coloured lead-in with matching cleats.
Choosing to run a lead-in along the line of motar joints looks neater, although old uneven or crooked walls you have to think ahead and possibly cleat the cable more to the way the wall runs for asthetics. Having a nice straight cable run can look awful on an ye olde cottage thats leaning on undulating.

Have cleat nails below a hoizontal cable, and on a vertical run. try to keep the nails the other side of where the cable will be seen the most.

Dont think of doing a fit as if it was on your house, think of each job as if its on your bosses house. Theres a lot to consider with asthetics, and keep in mind future unrelated maintaince work.

On where the cable goes through the wall another drip loop unless the cable is coming up to the hole from underneath, Never put a cleat at the bottom of the drip loop and place your palm over the loop and pull the bottom away from the wall so theres a small gap between the bottom of the loop and the wall, Both these avoid that green stripe down the wall.

Seal the hole with silicone, try injecting a bit into the hole, then finish off with a dab on the outside and smooth off. Of course the hole is drilled from the inside out and at a 15 degree angle downwards from inside to out. Oh and on the subject of moisture, always check where the DPC is as you never drill under that or through it.
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Aarron

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Re: Intalling overhead dropwire from pole to property
« Reply #7 on: November 15, 2014, 03:54:47 PM »

Thanks again Ezzer.

Just out of curiosity, whats the reason for not putting a cleat at the bottom of a drip loop? So when you have the dropwire connected at the property and pole, do you have to install the socket before you can connect at the cab? And to locate, is this done using a tone probe?

I read somewhere that the box at the top of a pole uses the screw type termination instead of IDC, is this correct? Do you know what the box is called at the top of a pole as I've been trying to find some images but I'm assuming it has two sides, one to terminate the dropwires and the other that connects them to the cab, would this be correct?

I've noticed on some properties they have a little black joint box that attaches to the outside of the property which I assume is to joint the dropwire, which would make it easier if there was a fault with the lead in, saves replacing the whole dropwire, is this standard practice or is having one full run the standard?

Many thanks for the info again, I really appreciate it.
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