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Author Topic: Advice on fault fixing  (Read 10827 times)

ryant704

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Re: Advice on fault fixing
« Reply #30 on: June 11, 2013, 04:50:59 PM »

Personally I cannot think of anything more to ask the engineer but others may have valid questions!

There is no point arguing with BT, just ask for a deadlock letter on the matter and then contact the Ombudsman (if the outcome is bad on Thursday).

It really depends on the engineer but you would have to get lucky to be honest, as stated request a deadlock letter with whom you're in contact with!
« Last Edit: June 11, 2013, 04:56:12 PM by ryant704 »
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bbnovice

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Re: Advice on fault fixing
« Reply #31 on: June 13, 2013, 06:26:45 PM »

Hi:
An update.

The OR broadband engineer visited today and I seem (fingers crossed) to have got a result!

He tidied up the wiring in the cabinet (to reduce cross talk), replaced the incoming cable into my premises from an OR external junction box also on my property (don’t ask!), relocated the cable run so that it now connects directly into the rear of the OR NTE (to standardise cable size), and replaced the OR ADSDL faceplate with a proper VDSL one (should have been done 18 months ago as part of the original installation?). The error rates on the line were now substantially reduced but some residual and sporadic errors remained. Luckily these were identified as being caused by a powerline ethernet adaptor in the same room as the modem/hub. Disconnecting the adaptor resulted in the random errors disappearing.

Next a DLM reset. There have been so many faults and work done on the local OR network over the past 3 weeks that a “clean start” was considered essential.

Finally a general circuit test (I don’t know what this was but it was done by using my phone to call some test system) and this reported back to his mobile phone that there was an “un-rectified error” (I think that is what it said). However as the circuit (voice and broadband) tested 100% OK (several times) at the NTE he assumed that the fault is somewhere in my internal extension wiring. He quickly tested if the extension wiring was “reversed” but apparently this was not the case. As the fault seems to be in my extension wiring he obviously could do no more.

The overall result is that (according to the BT retail speed tester) the line synched at 62.2, and the download/upload speeds were 59.1/13.6. Compare this to the BT Wholesale speed estimator forecast of up to 51.7/13,2, and the average actual speed over the 12 month leading up to the recent outage of 48/12. That speed was just about constant over that period.

So I’ve got a lot more download speed than I’ve had at any time over the previous 18 months. Let’s hope it stays that way.

I’m left with a suspected fault of some kind in the internal phone wiring but as it does not seem to be affecting anything am I safe in ignoring it for now?

BBN
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ryant704

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Re: Advice on fault fixing
« Reply #32 on: June 13, 2013, 06:45:49 PM »

Good result...

I wouldn't "ignore" it but just monitor your connection...
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burakkucat

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Re: Advice on fault fixing
« Reply #33 on: June 13, 2013, 07:36:31 PM »

Quote
. . .  this reported back to his mobile phone that there was an “un-rectified error” (I think that is what it said).

I suspect that it was actually referring to a 'rectified loop error'. This is where one of the joints is somewhat suspect and it is actually acting as a semiconducting device. The cure will be quite straightforward. Isolate your telephone extension wiring at the SSFP by removing the lower front face-plate. Assuming that the lower front face-plate was fitted by the Openreach engineer, we will ignore the connections at that point. Systematically work back along the telephony extension cable to each socket in turn and remake every connection. When you reach the end of the 'daisy-chain', you should have cleared the fault.  :)
« Last Edit: June 13, 2013, 08:08:22 PM by burakkucat »
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bbnovice

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Re: Advice on fault fixing
« Reply #34 on: June 13, 2013, 07:51:07 PM »

Thanks for the advice and I will certainly do as suggested as soon as I can.

But I have been somewhat poorly recently, hence my question about ignoring the possible extension wiring fault for the moment. Is it likely to upset the broadband or is it not really possible to say?

Thanks

BBN

PS: I forgot to mention in my previous post that he bought an ECI modem with him "just in case", but it was not needed. Mine is an HG connected to a Huawei cabinet etc. Just to confirm what others have posted, he told me that OR now only supply ECI to their engineers. Luckily I have a spare, new and unused HG courtesy of ebay.       




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asbokid

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Re: Advice on fault fixing
« Reply #35 on: June 13, 2013, 07:57:14 PM »


Rectified Loop Faults

Corrosion (or verdigris) across PCB tracks or between adjacent pins on telephone sockets are prime examples of this type of fault condition. Whilst stable linear loop faults do not give much cause for concern to DSL systems, rectified loop faults are more of a problem because they are nonlinear and introduce cross modulation (a sort of self interference which cannot be equalized away). They are also often very dynamic in nature and can stay in an "inactive" state until they become activated, e.g., by a DC line polarity reversal which may be associated with the application of ringing current to the associated analog interface. Essentially, these types of faults are "turned-on" when an incoming call is received at the ADSL customer's analog interface - the customer has no problem making outgoing POTS calls but may experience problems with premature ring trip (false answer) and high ADSL bit errors on incoming calls.

There is a BT socket here that caused a long-standing rectified loop fault in my parents house. It confounding the rookie engineer (me!) who was instructed to repair it.  Only  on closer inspection in good light was a fine coating of verdigris discovered on the pins in the socket (the sprung pins which contact the BT 413A/613A plug).

If only to prevent corrosion, there might, arguably, be something gained from using gold plated connectors!   A photo of the point of corrosion might be useful for the OP (BBN) and others fault-shooting.

cheers, a
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burakkucat

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Re: Advice on fault fixing
« Reply #36 on: June 13, 2013, 08:06:19 PM »

A good spray with Electrolube Switch & Contact Cleaner (is it still obtainable?  :-\ ) and the application of a cotton-bud may have been all that was required to clear the fault.  :-X
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bbnovice

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Re: Advice on fault fixing
« Reply #37 on: June 13, 2013, 09:17:03 PM »

Ok

What I've done as a temporary measure is to remove the lower part of the face plate and connect the main phone into the test socket. The extensions obviously don't work now, but they are not often used anyway.

I will let the broadband connection do its own thing for the time being - any fault/speed issues that arise from now on will not be attributable to my internal wiring.

This will let me examine/fix the internal wiring when I feel up to it and have the time.

The powerline ethernet bridge has been removed, but this means that I can no longer connect my SKY HD box to broadband for TV Anytime/Catch Up. I see that Sky offer a wireless connector for £20 which allegedly addresses this requirement but from what I've seen on their support forums they do not appear to be much good (difficult to set up/unreliable). 

Has anybody got any alternative broadband wireless adapter/Sky TV suggestions?

Thanks for your patience.

BBN


   
 
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