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Author Topic: New phone scam tactics  (Read 450 times)

sevenlayermuddle

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New phone scam tactics
« on: April 15, 2018, 11:17:46 PM »

I’ve had a few recently, along the lines...

Ring, Ring... recorded message along the lines of...  “this is BT, your connection has been compromised.  Please press ‘1’ to speak to an advisor”.

Clearly, this is a tactic to avoid those of us who enjoy leading them on.  Good news though, it shows that  we are getting under their skin. 

Even better news...

A) Feel free to press ‘1’.   You will not be charged, that is an urban myth.

B) After pressing ‘1’, you seem to get connected to a ‘next level’ scammer, vs the old familiar callers reading from a script.   That is, a more educated scammer who speaks good English, and who is reserved for people identified and validated as probable suckers.   As such, their criminal masterminds will be paying them more and, by wasting their time, you are rendering the whole criminal enterprise all the less rewarding.

C) It is just as easy as always to wind them up.  Waste their time, make them angry.   And as always for me at least, the measure of success is, whilst remaining polite yourself,  how much they end up swearing at you.   :D

Above is based on recent personal experience.    :)
« Last Edit: April 16, 2018, 08:39:43 AM by sevenlayermuddle »
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banger

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Re: New phone scam tactics
« Reply #1 on: April 16, 2018, 01:21:19 AM »

I had two calls the other day in short succession asking about my BT Wifi router. First call I just said I dont have a BT router and second call I just hung up after the same line. Pretty annoying.
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Tim
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Ronski

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Re: New phone scam tactics
« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2018, 01:41:45 PM »

When I have time to spare it can be quite funny winding them up and playing dumb,  then entering the wrong details when asked  :lol:
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tiffy

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Re: New phone scam tactics
« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2018, 02:54:34 PM »

A variation of telephone scam I had not heard of before which featured a few weeks ago on a radio consumer program here in N.I..

Phone rings, CLI displays a local, Belfast code, 028 90 ******, in the instance quoted, the recipient did not get to the phone in time, did not recognise the number but being a local code decided to call back.
Was now informed that the number was not active and advised to call directory enquires on a quoted 118 number, the rediculously exorbitant charges associate with 118 directory enquiry numbers was advised at the end of the message if the recipient listened long enough before dialling as advised.

The consumer program did their best to try and find out from BT who the "inactive" number was registered to but drew a blank as BT advised it was not registered through them.
Strange an "inactive" telephone number can generate phone calls ?

I would certainly consider this to be a scam in association with the 118 number quoted, check the cost of a 1 second connection to 118 directory enquiry numbers if in any doubt.
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Ronski

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Re: New phone scam tactics
« Reply #4 on: April 16, 2018, 03:44:23 PM »

Tiffy,  caller display numbers can be spoofed,  they can even spoof the sender number for text messages.
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tiffy

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Re: New phone scam tactics
« Reply #5 on: April 16, 2018, 04:37:11 PM »

Yes, there are a lot of clever, very resourceful and determined scammers out there dedicated to separating the unwary from their money, just a variation I had not heard of to date.

The very long established and well respected BBC radio consumer program who normally get results could not get to the bottom of this issue with respect to the registered owner of the 028 90 ****** "inactive" telephone number.
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burakkucat

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Re: New phone scam tactics
« Reply #6 on: April 16, 2018, 05:06:25 PM »

I am thinking about coupling the output from a Wandel & Goltermann Pegelsender PS-10, set to swept tone, to the circuit when the next scam caller tries their luck.

Here is an example, at a level of -15 dBm. For maximum effect I think the output should be at 0 dBm . . . which would certainly get the message across to someone wearing a headset.  :D
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4candles

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Re: New phone scam tactics
« Reply #7 on: April 16, 2018, 11:12:06 PM »

I like your thinking, Mr Cat.  :)



C) It is just as easy as always to wind them up.  Waste their time, make them angry.   And as always for me at least, the measure of success is, whilst remaining polite yourself,  how much they end up swearing at you.   :D


Indeed, very satisfying.  :)
It's been a few years now since anyone's tried it on, so I've had plenty of time to think. Next time...   >:D
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sevenlayermuddle

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Re: New phone scam tactics
« Reply #8 on: April 17, 2018, 12:21:37 AM »

For those who have never experienced the swearing, it really is worthwile.

Don’t think of the nasty teenage yobs at your local bus stop, who are not at all funny and best ignored.  Rather, think of some Quentin Tarantino US gangster film, with explicit threats of violence and insults that, over and over again, mention your mother along with a particular swear word.

Now imagine same dialogue, but enacted by the familiar condescending foreign accent you hear whenever you call an outsourced call centre.     It really is incredibly funny, completely free, and always brightens my day.      :D
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Weaver

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Re: New phone scam tactics
« Reply #9 on: April 17, 2018, 05:16:05 AM »

Since I gave up on BT and have no landline phone number at all, all the bad guys seem to have completely gone away. We have a voip-provided number that redirects to a mobile and a mobile number.
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sevenlayermuddle

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Re: New phone scam tactics
« Reply #10 on: April 17, 2018, 10:16:01 AM »

Since I gave up on BT and have no landline phone number at all, all the bad guys seem to have completely gone away. We have a voip-provided number that redirects to a mobile and a mobile number.

I think a lot depends upon whether the number has yet been harvested by the marketing industry.  It may only be a matter of time, but it can be quite a long time if you are careful.

Most of the calls we get do address us by name, but despite the fact ISP accounts are in my name,  the scammers almost invariably have other half’s name.   One difference is, she tends to enroll for supermarket loyalty cards, airline and hotel points, etc etc, whereas I always refuse.
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Weaver

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Re: New phone scam tactics
« Reply #11 on: April 19, 2018, 01:39:50 AM »

Most of the email spam I get is either via the Mrs’s own exposure in her many public web sites or else by my exposure via whois listings. I stupidly put a poorly-chosen vulnerable email address into the whois for a load of domain names thinking becaus I needed to pick up authorisation probe emails going to it and I would be able to change it straight afterwards, but then I got into a 60-day ICANN whois change lockout, something that was new to me, and which has cause me a lot of inconvenience.
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