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Author Topic: FTTP  (Read 1366 times)

Ronski

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Re: FTTP
« Reply #30 on: April 19, 2017, 06:37:33 PM »

I'm not denying that existing FTTC needs to be improved.  Many people, self included, struggle to reach any more than 20s of Mbps, and that's not enough.   These are the people I think BT should be trying to help.

There you go, if you had FTTP you would have the speeds you'd ordered presuming no congestion elsewhere.

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But this (subject of this thread) is about a new, ground-up, development.   Surely all it would take would be careful positioning of cabinets, to ensure everybody there gets perfectly good FTTC?

I wonder if the real issue might be, for ground-up new developments (whole new towns), Fibre might a actually be as cheap, or cheaper than copper.

Exactly, laying fibre to you or me is very expensive because the roads have to be dug up in a lot of cases, and peoples drives and gardens, unless of course you're fed by poles - we're not. On a new estate it is built fully ducted right into the house. So which is cheaper - installing FTTC cabs, power to them etc, or simply pulling fibre through those ducts straight into the properties. By using fibre you don't get all the ongoing maintenance issues you get with copper either, so cheaper long term as well.

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Leaving the consumer to foot the bill for additional costs of terminal equipment with backup batteries and I think (may stand corrected) increased energy costs vs FTTC modems?

You only need back up batteries for the ONT to enable a land line phone to work, the large majority of people won't have back batteries for the broadband equipment, and a lot won't even have a land line, we only have dect phones (very rarely used) and no battery backup for the base station even though I have a UPS for all the network gear. We 4 mobiles in the house on two different networks. I doubt the ONT is any more expensive to run than a modem for FTTC, although you'll need a two box solution like many of us have anyway.

If it was a choice between FTTC and FTTP I know what the large majority of us would choose :-)

https://www.ofcom.org.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0021/63912/bt_group_plc.pdf

Edited to add battery backup links
« Last Edit: April 19, 2017, 06:45:09 PM by Ronski »
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sevenlayermuddle

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Re: FTTP
« Reply #31 on: April 19, 2017, 06:53:25 PM »

fibre for data is decades old tech

Good point, in fact I worked on FDDI development for a while.  In early 90s, FDDI was seen as the bee's knees, lightning fast 100Mbps, future proofing fast  corporate lans.   It didn't last, it was rendered obsolete by fast ethernet, yes... copper.
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Ignitionnet

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Re: FTTP
« Reply #32 on: April 20, 2017, 09:02:01 PM »

Good point, in fact I worked on FDDI development for a while.  In early 90s, FDDI was seen as the bee's knees, lightning fast 100Mbps, future proofing fast  corporate lans.   It didn't last, it was rendered obsolete by fast ethernet, yes... copper.

It ended up moving to core and transport networks, and indeed anywhere where a run longer than 100m was required. It certainly wasn't obsoleted. Much as copper has allowed BT to delay FTTP copper supplies services that are 'good enough' for LANs. There are some really good, practical reasons for this. The only practical reason to use copper now is exclusive to Openreach and is because they don't want to invest.

Can't really compare having G.fast standards modified to accommodate BT not wanting to build fibre deeper into their network to a corporate LAN.
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